Design a Phone Menu for Your Auto Attendant

Document created by Cisco Documentation Team on Feb 13, 2017Last modified by Cisco Documentation Team on Apr 3, 2017
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When setting up an auto attendant, you can include phone menus to help your callers get what they need quickly and easily.

To find the Auto Attendant Builder: Choose Services > Call > Features. Create a new auto attendant (see https://help.webex.com/docs/DOC-17732) or edit an existing one.

To add a phone menu: Click the blue plus sign, and choose Phone Menu.

Important:

When working in the Auto Attendant Builder, be sure to save your changes before you close the window.

Building Blocks for Phone Menus

Message (at the top of the menu)

Provide instructions about the menu. For example: “If you know your party's extension, press Pound. For Sales, press 1. For Service, press 2. To hear our office hours, press 3. To speak to an operator, press 0. To hear these options again, press Star.”

You can type messages or upload audio files.

To learn more, see the Related Links list.

Input Digits

Your menu can include up to 12 choices—one for each key on the phone keypad: 0-9, #, and *.

If you add submenus, they also can include up to 12 choices.

Dial By Extension

The caller can dial any extension number.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included this instruction: "If you know your party's extension, press Pound." Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit #.

  2. We chose Dial by Extension.

  3. We entered this message: "Please enter the extension number now."

You can type messages or upload audio files.

To learn more, see the Related Links list.

Play Submenu

The caller hears a submenu with a new set of options.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included this instruction: "For Sales, press 1." Although we could have routed these calls to a specific agent or a hunt group, we decided to provide a submenu that guides people to the right person. Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 1.

  2. We chose Play Submenu.

  3. We entered this message: "For furniture, press 1. For appliances, press 2. For all other requests, press 0. To hear this menu again, press Star."

  4. We set up the submenu by using various building blocks (not described in this example).

Repeat This Menu

The caller hears the message again.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included this instruction: "To hear these options again, press Star." Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit *.

  2. We chose Repeat This Menu.

Route to Auto Attendant

The call is sent to a different auto attendant that offers a different experience. It might have a different language, a different voice, or a different business name.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included this instruction: "For Service, press 2." Although we could have created a submenu, we have already have an auto attendant for that department. We simply wanted to transfer calls over there. Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 2.

  2. We chose Route to Auto Attendant, and then chose the Service auto attendant from the list.

Route to Hunt Group

The call is sent to a hunt group that you have set up to route calls.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included this instruction: "For Sales, press 1." Although we could have created a submenu, we have a hunt group for Sales. It routes calls randomly among agents. We simply wanted to transfer these calls to that group. Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 1.

  2. We chose Route to Hunt Group, and then we chose the Sales hunt group from the list.

Route to Phone Number

The call is sent to an external number.

Example: We have a business with two offices. At the top of our menu, we included these instructions: "For our branch office, press 9. For our main office, choose from the following options." (Then it lists the options). Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 9.

  2. We chose Route to Phone Number, and then we entered the phone number.

  3. We set up the input digits and actions for the main office (not included in this example).

Route to User

The call is sent to a specific employee, such as your receptionist or the sales agent for a particular product.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included these instructions: "For appointments with Dr. Smith, press 1. For appointments with Dr. Jones, press 2. For all other calls, press 0." Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 1.

  2. We chose Route to User, and then we chose the appointment secretary for Dr. Smith.

  3. We clicked Add another input digit.

  4. We chose 2 and Route to User, and then we chose the appointment secretary for Dr. Jones.

  5. We clicked Add another input digit.

  6. We chose 0 and Route to User, and then we chose the receptionist.

Route to Voicemail

The call is sent to a specific voicemail box.

Example: In our Closed Hours menu, the message says: "Our office is closed now. If you would like to leave a message for our office manager, please press 1." Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 1.

  2. We chose Route to Voicemail, and then we selected the voicemail box for our office manager.

Say Message for a menu option

The caller hears a message.

Example: At the top of our menu, we included this instruction: "To hear our office hours, press 3." Here's how we set it up:

  1. We chose the input digit 3.

  2. We chose Say Message, and then typed the information.

You can type messages or upload audio files.

To learn more, see the Related Links list.




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