Deploy Hybrid Media Service

Document created by Cisco Documentation Team on Jul 11, 2016Last modified by Cisco Documentation Team on Aug 31, 2017
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Hybrid Media Service Overview

 

Cisco Spark Hybrid Media Service dynamically finds the optimal mix of on-premises and cloud conferencing resources. On-premises conferences stay on premises when there are enough local resources. When local resources are exhausted, conferences then expand to the cloud.

Cisco Spark Hybrid Media Node is software that is installed on a Cisco UCS server and managed in Cisco Spark Control Hub. Cisco Spark (basic and advanced) meetings and Cisco Spark app calls (between two people) can be routed to the local, on-net Cisco Spark Hybrid Media node. Cisco Spark Hybrid Media Service selects the most efficient way to use the available resources.

  

Cisco Spark Hybrid Media Service provides these benefits:

  
  •  

    Improves quality and reduces latency by allowing you to keep your calls on premises.

      

  •  

    Extends your calls transparently to the cloud when on-premises resources have reached their limit or are unavailable.

      

  •  

    Manage your Hybrid Media Nodes from the cloud with a single interface: Cisco Spark Control Hub (https://admin.ciscospark.com).

      

  •  

    Optimize resources and scale capacity, as needed.

      

  •  

    Combines the features of cloud and on-premises conferencing in one seamless user experience.

      

  •  

    Reduces capacity concerns, because the cloud is always available when additional resources are needed.

      

  • Provides advanced reporting on capacity and usage in https://admin.ciscospark.com.

     

  

Quality of Service on Hybrid Media Nodes

 

For Quality of Service (QoS), Hybrid Media Nodes natively mark all traffic (audio, video, content, iX, BFCP, and so on) with DSCP AF41.

    

Hybrid Media Node Demo Software

 
Use the demo image for Hybrid Media Nodes only for demo purposes. We recommend that you avoid adding a demo image to an existing production cluster. The demo cluster accepts fewer calls than production and expires 90 days from registration to the cloud.

Note


 

The Hybrid Media Node demo software is not supported by Cisco TAC.

  
  

Capacity

   

With the demo software, a Hybrid Media Node can handle 3-5 SIP clients and 10-15 room or conference devices.

  

Use Cases for the Hybrid Media Node Demo Software

   
Media Anchored to On-Premises
 
  •  

    Deploy and configure the node with the demo software.

      

  •  

    Run a meeting that includes the following participants: a Cisco Spark app participant, Cisco Spark endpoint participant, and a Cisco Spark Board.

      

  •  

    After the meeting is over, from the customer view in https://admin.ciscospark.com, go to Reports to access the Hybrid Media reports. In the reports, you can see that the media stayed on-premises.

      

  
  
Meeting with Cloud and On-Premises Participants
 
  •  

    Run another meeting with a couple of Cisco Spark participants on-premises and one in the cloud.

      

  •  

    Observe that all participants can seamlessly join and participate in the meeting.

      

  
  

Known Issue

   

DNS works, but may fail to save network configuration under certain conditions when you use FQDN for hostname and NTP servers. As a workaround, use IP addresses only so that you can save the initial configuration.

  

Hybrid Media Clusters

Hybrid Media Nodes are deployed in clusters. A cluster defines Hybrid Media Nodes with similar attributes, such as network proximity. Cisco Spark participants are directed to use a particular cluster or the cloud, depending on the following conditions:

  •  

    A client on a corporate network that can reach an on-premises cluster will connect to it—the primary preference for clients that are on the corporate network.

      

  •  

    A client that cannot reach an on-premises cluster will connect to the cloud—the case for a mobile device that is not connected to the corporate network.

      

Each cluster contains logic that cascades meetings across other clusters, as needed. Cascading provides data path for media between clients in their meetings. Meetings are distributed across nodes and the clients land on the most efficient node nearest to them, depending on factors such as network topology, WAN link, and resource utilization.

Reachability is determined by the client's ability to "ping" media nodes. A variety of potential connection mechanisms such as UDP and TCP are used during an actual call. Before the call, the Cisco Spark device registers with the Cisco Collaboration Cloud, which provides a list of cluster candidates for the call.

Hybrid Media Cluster Deployment

  •  

    Create fewer clusters when resources have similar network proximity (affinity).

      

  • Whererever possible when creating clusters, add nodes that are in the same geographical region (and ideally the same data center).

     

  •  

    Typically, deploy clusters in enterprises that host frequent localized meetings. Plan where you place clusters on the bandwidth available at various WAN locations inside the enterprise. Over time, you can deploy and grow cluster-by-cluster based on observed user patterns.

      

  •  

    Clusters located in different time zones can effectively serve multiple geographies by taking advantage of different peak/busy hour calling patterns.

      

  •  

    If you have two hybrid media nodes in two separate data centers (EU and NA, for example), and you have endpoints join through each data center, the resulting cascade goes over the Multiprotocol Label Switching Wide Area Network (MPLS WAN).

      

Resources That Are Close Together

   

Fewer clusters makes sense when the resources are fairly close together. For example: Creating clusters in San Francisco and San Jose, California will likely yield misleading statistics. From a network topology and latency standpoint, the two locations are nearly identical, because of their relatively close geographical proximity. Calls that overflow from either of the two locations to the other may show similar experiences and network behaviors. Calls will likely overflow between the two locations, but having the two clusters adds more management complexity. In this case, overflows would not involve a degraded or suboptimal experience. As a result, consider a "Northern California" cluster and name the nodes based on the city in which they are located.

  

Time Zone Diversity

   

Time zone diversity can allow clusters to be shared during off-peak times. For example: A company with a Northern California cluster and a New York cluster might find that overall network latency is not that high between the two locations that serve a geographically diverse user population. When resources are at peak usage in the Northern California cluster, the New York cluster is likely to be off peak and have additional capacity. The same applies for the Northern California cluster, during peak times in the New York cluster. These aren't the only mechanisms used for effective deployment of resources, but they are the two main ones.

  

Overflow to the Cloud

   

When the capacity of all on-premises clusters are reached, an on-premises participant overflows to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud. This does not mean that all calls will be hosted in the cloud. Only those participants that are either remote or can't connect to an on-premises cluster will be directed to the cloud. In a call with both on-premises and cloud participants, the on-premises cluster is bridged (cascaded) to the cloud to combine all participants into a single call.

  

Cisco Spark Device Registers with Cisco Collaboration Cloud

In addition to determining reachability, the clients also perform periodic round-trip delay tests using Simple Traversal of UDP through NAT (STUN). STUN round-trip (SRT) delay is an important factor when selecting potential resources during an actual call. When multiple clusters are deployed, the primary selection criteria are based on the learned SRT delay. Reachability tests are performed in the background, initiated by a number of factors including network changes, and do not introduce delays that affect call setup times. The following two examples show possible reachability test outcomes.

Round-trip Delay Tests—Cloud Device Fails to Reach On-Premises Cluster

Round-trip Delay Tests—Cloud Device Successfully Reaches On-Premises Cluster

Learned reachability information is provided to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud every time a call is set up. This information allows the cloud to select the best resource (cluster or cloud), depending on the relative location of the client to available clusters and the type of call. If no resources are available in the preferred cluster, additional clusters are tested for availability based on SRT delay. A preferred cluster is chosen with the lowest SRT delay. Calls are served on premises from a secondary cluster when the primary cluster is busy. Local reachable Hybrid Media resources are tried first, in order of lowest SRT delay. When all local resources are exhausted, the participant connects to the cloud.

Cluster definition and location is critical for a deployment that provides the best overall experience for participants. Ideally, a deployment should provide resources where the clients are located. If not enough resources are allocated where the clients make the majority of calls, more internal network bandwidth is consumed to connect users to distant clusters.

On-Premises and Cloud Call

On-premises Spark devices that have the same cluster affinity (preference, based on proximity to the cluster) connect to the same cluster for a call. On-premises Spark devices with different on-premises cluster affinities, connect to different clusters and the clusters then bridged to the cloud to combine the two environments into a single call.

On-Premises Call with Different Cluster Affinities

The Spark device connects to either on-premises cluster or cloud based upon its reachability. The following show examples of the most-common scenarios.

Cisco Spark Cloud Device Connects to Cloud

Cisco Spark On-Premises Device Connects to On-Premises Cluster

Cisco Spark On-Premises Device Connects to Cloud

Prepare Your Environment

Requirements for Hybrid Media Service

  
                 
Table 1 Configuration Requirements for Hybrid Media Node Software
 

Hardware Configuration

  
 

Specifications for Production Software Image

  
 

Specifications for Demo Software Image

  
 

Cisco Multiparty Media 410v server

  
 
 
  •  

    48vCPUs

      

  •  

    60 GB main memory

      

  •  

    250 GB local hard disk space

      

  
  
Note        

We do not support the first generation MM400v server.

  
  
 

  
 

Cisco Meeting Server 1000

  
 
 
  •  

    72vCPUs

      

  •  

    60 GB main memory

      

  •  

    250 GB local hard disk space

      

  
  
 

  
 

Specifications-based Configuration

  
 
 
  •  

    48vCPUs

      

  •  

    60 GB main memory

      

  •  

    250 GB local hard disk space

      

  •  

    2.6 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2600v3 or later processor

      

  
  
 
 
  •  

    12vCPUs

      

  •  

    8 GB main memory

      

  •  

    20 GB local hard disk space

      

  
  

Call Capacity on Hybrid Media Node Platforms

  
            
 

Server

  
 
 

Maximum Simultaneous High Definition Calls Per Server (Cisco Spark)

  
 

MM410v

  
 

100

  
 

CMS 1000

  
 

100

  
    

Deployment Models Supported by Hybrid Media Service

 

The following are supported in a Hybrid Media Service deployment:

  
  •  

    You can deploy a Hybrid Media Node in either a data center (preferred) or demilitarized zone (DMZ). For guidance, see Ports and Protocols Used by Hybrid Media Service.

        

  •  

    The following types of address translation are supported:

      

    •  

      Dynamic Network Address Translation (NAT) using an IP pool

        

    •  

      Dynamic Port Address Translation (PAT)

        

    •  

      Other forms of NAT should work as long as the correct ports and protocols are used, but we do not officially support them because they have not been tested.

        

      
  •  

    IPv4

      

  •  

    Static IP address for the Hybrid Media Node

      

  

The following are not supported in a Hybrid Media Service deployment:

  
  •  

    IPv6

      

  •  

    DHCP for the Hybrid Media Node

      

  • Dual network interfaces (NICs)

     

  

Ports and Protocols Used by Hybrid Media Service

 

To ensure a successful deployment of Hybrid Media Service, make sure you open the following ports for use with the protocols. Use the links at the bottom to understand network requirements for Cisco Spark Services.

  

To mitigate potential DNS query issues, follow the DNS Best Practices, Network Protections, and Attack Identification documentation when you configure your enterprise firewall.

  
Figure 1. Ports and Protocols for Management

   
The Hybrid Media Nodes should be in same cluster with the same VLAN or subnet mask.                                                                
 

Purpose

  
 

Source

  
 

Destination

  
 

Source IP

  
 

Source Port

  
 

Transport Protocol

  
 

Destination IP

  
 

Destination Port

  
 

Management

  
 

Management computer

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

As required

  
 

Any

  
 

TCP, HTTPS

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

443

  
 

SSH for access to Hybrid Media admin console

  
 

Management computer

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

As required

  
 

Any

  
 

TCP

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

22

  
 

Management

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

Cisco Collaboration Cloud

  
 

As required

  
 

Any

  
 

UDP, NTP

  

UDP, DNS

  

TCP, HTTPS (Websockets)

  
 

Any

  
 

1231

  

53

  
 

Cascade Signaling

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

Cisco Collaboration Cloud

  
 

Any

  
 

Any

  
 

TCP

  
 

Any

  
 

444

  
 

Management

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

Cisco Collaboration Cloud

  
 

As required

  
 

Any

  
 

TCP, HTTPS

  
 

*.docker.io

  

*.wbx2.com

  

*.webex.com

  
 

443

  
 

Management

  
 

Hybrid Media Node (1)

  
 

Hybrid Media Node (2)

  
 

Hybrid Media Node (1)

  
 

Any

  
 

TCP, HTTPS (Websockets)

  
 

Hybrid Media Node (2)

  
 

5000–5001

  
1 The default configuration in the OVA is configured for NTP and DNS. The OVA requires that you open those ports outbound to the internet. If you configure a local NTP and DNS server, then ports 53 and 123 are not required to be opened through the firewall.
 
Figure 2. Ports and Protocols for Cisco Spark Meetings

   
                                     
 

Purpose

  
 

Source

  
 

Destination

  
 

Source IP

  
 

Source Port

  
 

Transport Protocol

  
 

Destination IP

  
 

Destination Port

  
 

Calling to meeting

  
 

Apps (Cisco Spark mobile, web and desktop apps)

  

Spark room device

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

As required

  
 

Any

  
 

UDP and TCP (Used by the Cisco Spark app)

  

SRTP (Any)

  
 

Any

  
 

5004, 5006

  
 

Cascade

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

Cisco Collaboration Cloud

  
 

As required

  
 

34000–34999

  
 

UDP, SRTP (Any)**

  
 

Any

  
 

5004

  
 

Cascade

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

Hybrid Media Node

  
 

As required

  
 

34000–34999

  
 

UDP, SRTP (Any)**

  
 

Any

  
 

5004, 5006

  
    

** TCP is also supported, but not preferred because it may affect media quality.

  

For the best experience using Cisco Spark in your organization, configure your firewall to allow all outbound TCP and UDP traffic that is destined toward ports 5004 as well as any inbound replies to that traffic. The port requirements listed above assume that Hybrid Media Nodes are deployed either in the LAN (preferred) or in a DMZ and that Cisco Spark apps are in the LAN.

  

See the whitepaper below for more information about firewall and network practices for Cisco Spark services.

  

Bandwidth Requirements for Hybrid Media Service

 
Figure 3. One-to-One Local Call Bandwidth Requirements

  
Figure 4. One-to-One Local-Remote Call Bandwidth Requirements

  
Figure 5. Multiparty Local Call Bandwidth Requirements

  
Figure 6. Multiparty Local-Remote Call Bandwidth Requirements

  

Complete the Preinstallation Checklist for Hybrid Media Service

Use this checklist to ensure you are ready to install and configure your Hybrid Media Node.

        
1    Ensure the following is in place:
2    Acquire the following information from your network administrator to assign to your Hybrid Media Node:
  • IP address
  • Network mask
  • Gateway IP address
  • DNS servers
  • NTP servers
  • (Optional) Choose the hostname to be configured on the Hybrid Media Node.
    Note        

    If you plan to configure Hybrid Media Node with FQDN, you must create both forward- and reverse-DNS (A- and PTR-records) in the DNS configuration.

      
3    Before starting installation, make sure your Cisco Spark organization is enabled for Hybrid Media Service. This service is available for organizations with certain paid Cisco Spark subscriptions as documented in Requirements for Hybrid Media Service. Contact your Cisco partner or account manager for assistance.
4    Choose a supported hardware or specifications-based configuration for your Hybrid Media Node, as described in Requirements for Hybrid Media Service.   
Note        

Only one network interface card (NIC) is supported.

  
  
5    Make sure your server is running VMware ESXi 6 (or later) and vSphere 6 (or later) with a VM host operational.
What to Do Next

 

Install Hybrid Media Service Software

  

Deploy Hybrid Media Service

Install Hybrid Media Service Software

 

Use this procedure to deploy a Hybrid Media Node to your host server running VMware ESXi.

  
Before You Begin

 

  •  

    Read the Virtualization Software Requirements documentation to understand supported harware, coresidency inforormation, supported network configuration, supported VMWare versions and features.

      

  •  

    Make sure you have these required items:

      

    •  

      A computer with:

        

      •  

        VMware vSphere client 6.0 or later

          

        For a list of supported operating systems, refer to VMware documentation.

          

      •  

        Hybrid Media Service software OVA file downloaded

          

        Download the latest Hybrid Media Service software—From the customer view inhttps://admin.ciscospark.com, and go to Services > Hybrid Media > Set Up > Settings. There, you can access both the production and demo software images.

          

        
    •  

      A supported server with VMware ESXi 6.0 or later installed and running

        

      
  
            
1    Using your computer, open the VMware vSphere client and sign in to the ESXi system on the server.
2    Go to File > Deploy OVF Template.
3    On the Source page, identify where the OVA file is located, and then click Next.
4    On the OVF Template Details page, click Next, choose the type of deployment configuration, and then click Next.
  • MM410v
  • CMS 1000
   

The options are listed in the order of increasing resource requirements.

  
5    On the Name and Location page enter a Name for this Hybrid Media Node (for example, "Hybrid_Media_Node_1"), and then click Next.
6    On the Disk Format page, ensure that the default disk format of Thick Provision Lazy Zeroed is selected and then click Next.
7    On the Network Mapping page, choose the network option from the list of entries to provide the desired connectivity to the VM.
8    On the Ready to Complete page, click Finish.  

After deployment of the OVA is complete, your Hybrid Media Node appears in the list of VMs.

  
9    Right-click the Hybrid Media Node VM, and then choose Power > Power On.  

The Hybrid Media Service software is installed as a guest on the VM Host. You are now ready to sign in to the console and configure your Hybrid Media Node.

  

 

Troubleshooting Tips

You may experience a delay of a few minutes before the node containers come up. A bridge firewall message appears on the console during first boot, during which you can't sign in.  
What to Do Next

 

Log in to the Hybrid Media Node Console

  

Log in to the Hybrid Media Node Console

         
1    From the VMware vSphere client, go to your Hybrid Media Node VM, and then choose Console. The Hybrid Media Node VM boots up and a login prompt appears. If the login prompt does not appear, press Enter.
2    Use the following default login and password to log in:
  1. Login: admin
  2. Password: cisco
  Because you are logging in to your Hybrid Media Node for the first time, you must change the administrator passphrase (password).
3    For (current) password, enter the default password (from above), and then press Enter.
4    For new password, enter a new passphrase, and then press Enter.
5    For retype new password, retype the new passphrase, and then press Enter. A"Password successfully changed" message appears, and then the initial Cisco Hybrid Media Node screen appears with a message about unauthorized access being prohibited.
6    Press Enter to load the main menu.
What to Do Next

 

Set the Network Configuration of the Hybrid Media Node

  

Set the Network Configuration of the Hybrid Media Node

Use this procedure to configure a static IP address for your Hybrid Media Node, as well as change the hostname and NTP servers, if needed. DHCP is not currently supported.
           
1    From the main menu of the Hybrid Media Node console, choose option 2 Edit Configuration and then press Enter.
2    In the screen that describes the effect of changes to the Hybrid Media Node, press Enter.
3    Select Static and press Enter.  

The Configure Hybrid Media Node page appears.

  
4    Enter the IP address, Mask, Gateway and DNS information.  
  •  

    Your Hybrid Media Node must have an internal IP address and resolvable DNS name.

      

  •  

    Deploy all the devices on the same subnet or VLAN, so that all devices in a cluster are reachable from wherever the clients reside in your network.

      

  
5    (Optional) Change the hostname, domain or NTP server(s), if required.  
Note        

When using hostname, you must also enter a valid and resolvable domain. The total length of the FQDN must not exceed 64 characters.

  
  
6    Press Tab to choose Save, and then press Enter.
7    When you are prompted to reboot the system for the changes to take effect, press Enter.
8    When a message appears that indicates node changes may require that components be reconfigured, press Enter.  

After your Hybrid Media Node reboots, the network configuration changes take effect. The node shows as "Registered." In the background, the node updates the software and changes to "Active" when completely updated and ready to use. This process can take up to 5 minutes.

  
What to Do Next

 

Register the Hybrid Media Node to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud

  

Register the Hybrid Media Node to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud

 

Use this procedure to register your first Hybrid Media Node to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud. When you use Cisco Spark Control Hub to register your first node, you create a cluster to which the node is assigned. A cluster contains one or more media nodes that serve users in a specific geographic region.

  
Before You Begin

 

  •  

    Once you begin registration of a node, you must complete it within 60 minutes or you have to start over.

      

  •  

    Ensure that any popup blockers in your browser are disabled or that you allow an exception for admin.ciscospark.com.

      

  •  

    For best results, deploy all nodes of a cluster in the same data center. See Hybrid Media Clusters for how they work and best practices.

      

  
           
1    From the customer view in https://admin.ciscospark.com, go to Services, and then click Set Up from the Hybrid Media card.
2    Make sure you have installed and configured your Hybrid Media Node, and then click Add Resource.
3    In the first field, enter a name for the cluster to which you want to assign your Hybrid Media Node.  
Tip      

We recommend that you name a cluster based on where the nodes of the cluster are located geographically. Examples: "San Francisco" or "New York" or "Dallas."

  
4    In the second field, enter the FQDN or internal IP address of your Hybrid Media Node and then click Next.  

Enter the same internal IP address that you used to configure the node from the console.

  

A message appears indicating you can register your node to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud.

5    Click Go to Node.

A new browser tab opens and a warning message appears about the website certificate being invalid. This is normal.

6    Click Continue in the warning message.

After a few moments, you are redirected to the Hybrid Media Node connectivity tests for Cisco Collaboration Cloud services. If all tests are successful, the Enable Hybrid Services page appears. There, you confirm that you want to register your Hybrid Media Node with your Cisco Spark organization.

7    Click Allow.

Your account is validated, your Hybrid Media Node is registered and the message "Registration Complete" appears indicating your Hybrid Media Node is now registered to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud.

8    Click the portal link or close the tab to go back to the Media Service page.

On the Media Service page, you now see the new cluster that contains the Hybrid Media Node that you registered. Your Hybrid Media Node is ready for use in your Cisco Spark organization.

 

 

  • To register additional Hybrid Media Nodes, go to the Media Service page, click Add Resource and follow Steps 4–9.

     

  • When you deploy a new Hybrid Media Node, Cisco Spark apps and room devices won't recognize the new node for up to 2 hours. The clients check for node reachability during startup, a network change, or cache expiration. You can wait for 2 hours or, as a workaround, restart your Cisco Spark app or reboot the Cisco Spark room or desk device. Afterwards, call activity is captured in the Hybrid Media reports in Cisco Spark Control Hub.

     

Troubleshoot the Hybrid Media Node Registration

 

This section contains possible errors you may encounter during registration of your Hybrid Media Node to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud and suggested steps to correct them.

  

The domain could not be resolved.

   

Possible Cause     This message appears if the DNS settings configured on your Hybrid Media Node are not correct.

  

Solution     Sign in to the console of your Hybrid Media Node and make sure the DNS settings are correct.

  

Could not connect to site using port 443 via SSL

   

Possible Cause     This message appears if your Hybrid Media Node cannot connect to the Cisco Collaboration Cloud.

  

Solution     Make sure your network allows connectivity on the ports required for Hybrid Media Service. For details, see Ports and Protocols Used by Hybrid Media Service.

  
 
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